Current News

Currenetly we are all consumed with the Covid-19 virus. I encourage you to get informationfromreliable official sites.

Here is a list of some sites in no specific order that will provide reliable information and updates.

-cdc.org

-niaid.nih.gov

-fema.org

-ada.org

-who.org

-health .hawaii.gov

I hope these sites helps you to stay safe, healthy, and allow you to protect your family.

 

The quickest way to end this viral threat is to comply with the stay at home order.  If we stop new cases from occurring, we will stop the spread of the disease and new cases will slowly subside.  We need to comply for the safety of are loved ones and neighbors.

 

OFFICE CLOSURE

We have complied with the reccomendations of the ADA, Hawaii Dental Association, and now the Hawaii State Government to close our office until April 30th. This date may be changed depending on the current status of the virus.  Rest assured throughout this closure We will be available for all types of emergencies.  This includes but not limited toissues of any discomfort or pain,fracturing of teeth, temporary or permanemt crowns that have come off, broken dentures, missing fillings, and in some cases of patients who are currently under periodontal treatment who have underlying conditions like diabetes and cardiovascular disease.  Please feel free to call our office with any questions you my have.

 

On a special note temporary or permanemt crowns that have come off  should be addressed ASAP.  Not having a crown on the tooth could cause shifting of the tooth.  This could lead to excess adjustment or added cost if the crown needs to be remade. So please call us if this should occur.

 

Child with mouthguard.Kids who take part in athletic activities — whether they're playing on organized sports teams, bicycling, or just kicking a ball around — gain a host of well-documented health benefits. Yet inevitably, along with all the fun, the sense of achievement, and the character-building features of athletics, the possibility of injury exists. Does this mean your kids shouldn't play sports? Of course not! But it makes sense to learn about the risks involved, and to take appropriate precautions.

How prevalent are sports-related dental injuries? In 2012, the National Youth Sports Safety Foundation forecast that more than 3 million teeth would be knocked out in youth sporting events that year! Among all the dental injuries we treat in children, it is estimated that over 25% are sports-related, and the majority of these involve the top front teeth.

Besides the immediate trauma, sports-related injuries can result in time lost from school and work, and substantial cost — up to $20,000 over a lifetime to treat a missing permanent tooth. Yet there's a simple and relatively inexpensive way to reduce the chance of dental injury in children: A properly-fitted, comfortable mouthguard, worn whenever playing sports where the possibility of orofacial injury exists.

Use the Right Equipment

Athletic mouthguards.

You wouldn't let your child play football without a helmet and protective padding, right? Yet it might surprise you to know that kids playing basketball are 15 times more likely to sustain injuries to the mouth or face than football players! Mandatory mouthguards are one reason for that: More American kids wear mouth protection for football than any other sport, which has resulted in a dramatic drop in injuries.

Mouthguards are required in only four school-based sports: football, ice hockey, lacrosse, and field hockey. Yet basketball and baseball are associated with the largest number of dental injuries. Other sports for which the American Dental Association (ADA) recommends wearing a mouthguard include bicycling, soccer, skateboarding, wrestling and volleyball. Do mouthguards work? The ADA estimates that athletes who don't wear mouthguards are 60 times more likely to suffer dental injury than those who do.

What Type of Mouthguard Is Best?

The best mouthguard for your child is the one he or she actually wears, both at practice and on game day. There are several different types of mouthguards on the market, which generally fall into three categories:

  • An “off-the-shelf” mouthguard. Available at many sporting goods stores, this type comes in a limited range of sizes, and varies widely in quality. The least expensive option, it offers a minimal level of protection that's probably better than nothing. It generally must be clenched in the mouth, which can make wearing it uncomfortable and cause trouble breathing and speaking.
  • The “boil and bite” mouthguard. These are designed to be immersed in hot water, and then formed in the mouth using finger, tongue and bite pressure. When they can be made to fit adequately, they generally offer better protection than the first type—but they may still be uncomfortable, and usually fail to offer full coverage of the teeth.
  • A custom-made mouthguard. This is a piece of quality sports equipment that is custom fabricated for your child's mouth. How? Molds or impressions of your child's teeth will be made and then tough, resilient, high quality materials are perfectly fitted to that impression. This type of mouthguard offers your child maximum protection and a superior level of comfort — and its cost is quite reasonable.

At the present time, when top-quality sports equipment for kids can run in the hundreds of dollars, it makes more sense than ever to invest in the proven protection of a professionally made, custom-fitted mouthguard.

Related Articles

Mouthguards - Dear Doctor Magazine

Athletic Mouthguards There are times when an athlete can feel invincible… able to connect on every jump-shot, run faster and longer, or hit every pitch, but statistics show that even on their best days accidents can happen. An ounce of prevention goes a long way… For a small cost, a protective mouthguard can prevent excess anxiety, risk, injury, pain, suffering, and years of dental treatment... Read Article

Dental Injuries - Dear Doctor Magazine

The Field-Side Guide to Dental Injuries Accidents to the teeth, jaws and mouth can happen at any time during any sporting activity. Proper attention can save pain, alleviate anxiety and costly dental treatment. A little knowledge, as they say, can go along way. This field-side guide briefly explains some simple rules to follow when dealing with different dental injuries and when you need to see the dentist... Read Article

Sports Injuries - Dear Doctor Magazine

An Introduction to Sports Injuries & Dentistry Dental injuries incurred during sports activities are highly treatable, and can involve positive outcomes if participants act quickly to see a dentist after an injury. However, if not treated quickly these kinds of injuries can lead to discomfort, embarrassment and a lifetime of dental costs... Read Article