Current News

Currenetly we are all consumed with the Covid-19 virus. I encourage you to get informationfromreliable official sites.

Here is a list of some sites in no specific order that will provide reliable information and updates.

-cdc.org

-niaid.nih.gov

-fema.org

-ada.org

-who.org

-health .hawaii.gov

I hope these sites helps you to stay safe, healthy, and allow you to protect your family.

 

The quickest way to end this viral threat is to comply with the stay at home order.  If we stop new cases from occurring, we will stop the spread of the disease and new cases will slowly subside.  We need to comply for the safety of are loved ones and neighbors.

 

OFFICE CLOSURE

We have complied with the reccomendations of the ADA, Hawaii Dental Association, and now the Hawaii State Government to close our office until April 30th. This date may be changed depending on the current status of the virus.  Rest assured throughout this closure We will be available for all types of emergencies.  This includes but not limited toissues of any discomfort or pain,fracturing of teeth, temporary or permanemt crowns that have come off, broken dentures, missing fillings, and in some cases of patients who are currently under periodontal treatment who have underlying conditions like diabetes and cardiovascular disease.  Please feel free to call our office with any questions you my have.

 

On a special note temporary or permanemt crowns that have come off  should be addressed ASAP.  Not having a crown on the tooth could cause shifting of the tooth.  This could lead to excess adjustment or added cost if the crown needs to be remade. So please call us if this should occur.

 

Tooth Wear.When advanced gum disease (periodontitis) develops, your teeth are in danger: At this stage, the ligaments and bone tissue that surround them are being destroyed, and you could even begin losing teeth! If the disease can't be controlled by non-surgical treatments like cleaning and scaling, then periodontal flap surgery may be your best treatment option.

Flap surgery is today's leading method for treating and repairing periodontal pockets. What are these “pockets?” They are areas below the gum line where gum tissue has detached from the teeth, resulting in an uncleansable space where harmful bacteria can proliferate. These bacteria cause inflammation of the tissues, resulting in sensitivity, bleeding, and pain. Left untreated, they can cause a host of problems including gum disease, loss of the tooth-supporting bone structure, and possibly even systemic (whole-body) problems.

When periodontal pockets develop, the first step in treating them is usually via cleaning and scaling (also referred to as root debridement) with a manual or ultrasonic instrument. If this isn't effective, then periodontal surgery is considered. Flap surgery isn't a cure for periodontal disease — but it helps create an environment that makes it easier to maintain your periodontal health. And even if you're prone to gum disease, proper professional treatment and regular care at home can help keep your teeth healthy for as long as possible.

The Goals of Flap Surgery

One major objective of flap surgery is to eliminate or reduce the pocket itself. To access it, a flap-like incision is made in the gum tissue. This allows diseased tissue to be removed from inside the pocket, and provides access to the teeth's root surfaces for a thorough cleaning, which helps to eliminate harmful plaque and calculus (tartar). Afterward, the “flap” is closed, sealing the area. This begins the healing process, which takes place rapidly.

Another goal is the regeneration of periodontal ligament and bone tissue which may have been lost to the disease. A variety of techniques may be used to accomplish this, including high-tech methods of bone grafting and chemicals referred to as growth factors. These approaches help restore the gums to their normal form and function, and promote the healthy and secure anchoring of teeth.

The Flap Surgery Procedure

Periodontal flap surgery.

Flap surgery is typically done under local anesthesia, sometimes accompanied by oral anti-anxiety medications; alternatively, it may be performed under intravenous conscious sedation. After anesthesia has taken effect, a small incision is made to separate the gums from the teeth. The outer gum tissue is gently folded back to give access to the roots and the supporting ligament and bone tissue.

Next, the inflamed gum tissue can be removed, and the tooth roots can be cleaned; if needed, the area may also be treated with antibiotics or other medications. Bone defects can be repaired with grafting material, and proper regeneration of the periodontal ligament can be encouraged by physical (barrier membranes) and chemical (growth factors) methods. Finally, the incision is closed and the procedure is completed.

Performed by an experienced hand, state-of-the-art flap surgery has an excellent track record and offers well-established benefits. It's often the treatment of choice for relieving periodontal disease and helping to maintain your oral health — and preserve your teeth.

Related Articles

Periodontal Flap Surgery - Dear Doctor Magazine

Periodontal Flap Surgery Most surgical patients are surprised by how comfortable the experience of flap surgery is and how painless it is afterward. Today's highly sophisticated and meticulous techniques allow the periodontal surgeon to reconstitute, regenerate, and reconstruct lost and destroyed tissues. Find out how periodontal surgery can prolong the life of your teeth... Read Article

Periodontal (Gum) Disease - Dear Doctor Magazine

Understanding Gum (Periodontal) Disease Have your gums ever bled when you brushed or flossed? This most commonly overlooked simple sign may be the start of a silent progressive disease leading to tooth loss. Learn what you can do to prevent this problem and keep your teeth for life... Read Article